Open Science in Perspective Symposium: Early Career Researcher Edition

Hear directly from early career researchers engaged in research that sheds light on how the open movement is perceived among students and faculty. Throughout this symposium, up-and-coming scholars will discuss about how to improve the conversation around open innitiatives, clarify misconceptions, and inform the ways we teach open practices in the classroom.

Thursday, March 28, 2019, 6:30pm-8:00pm 

 

Recording with captions avaialbale here: https://youtu.be/9rMd8jOv4Vs

Captions sponsored by the River Campus Libraries, the Graduate Student Society and the Graduate Student Association

 

Program sponsored by the River Campus LibrariesDepartment of Clinical & Social Sciences in Psychology and the Graduate Student Association.

Sessions & Speakers

  Moderator: Thuy-vy Nguyen. PhD - Center for Self-Determination Theory and Clinical & Social Sciences in Psychology at University of Rochester

How to promote open science: An assessment of students and faculty’s perception of open practices 

The Open Access movement seeks to leverage the internet revolution to quickly and easily communicate information to a wide audience at a low cost by making scholarly work freely and immediately available online. To better inform McMaster University’s library on how to promote open practices, the presenter and his team conducted an environmental assessment of their perception among students and faculty. They found that students have a general grasp of the benefits of open practices, but there are still misconceptions of how to actually achieve them. In this talk, the presenter’ll discuss in detail the results of this survey and propose ways to promote open practices among students and faculty.

 

Hector Orozco is a machine learning programmer that recently finished a Masters degree in neuroscience at McMaster University. During his degree, Hector became involved with the Open Access movement by both representing McMaster at OpenCon 2017 and by developing a project to understand the perceptions of the open movement among students and faculty.

Why open science: A primer on open science for graduate students and early career researchers 

The field of psychology has been put into the spotlight because of the poor replicability of published work, a phenomenon more known as the “reproducibility/replication crisis”. One of the many solutions proposed to address this is open science—a movement that aims to make science more accessible for everyone. In this presentation, the presenter will present his ongoing study on the “producibility crisis” of psychology research in the Philippines and how open science can be an answer to both crises. He will also talk about the extent of what open science can do for graduate students and early career researchers.

 

James Montilla Doble is a lecturer and PhD student in Psychology at University of the Philippines Diliman. He is also a founding member of Philippine Researchers for Open Science (PROScience), a multi-disciplinary network of Filipino open science advocates. James’ research interests include romantic and “gray area” relationships and metapsychology.

No replication, no trust? How low replicability influences trust in Psychology 

Low replicability is a central topic in the current psychological debate. While the replication crisis has a huge impact on psychological research, we know little about the impact on lay people’s trust in psychological science. In this talk, the speaker will present and discuss recent findings from five preregistered studies. The studies provide evidence that low replicability reduces public trust in psychological science. Additionally, commonly used trust-repair strategies, such as information about increased transparency, explanations for low replicability, or recovered replicability did not repair public trust significantly. Overall, the talk (which is available as a preprint by Tobias Wingen, Jana Berkessel, and Birte Englick) will highlight the crucial importance of replicability for public trust..

 

Jana Berkessel is a PhD Candidate at the University of Mannheim in Germany. Jana’s main research interests revolve around cross-cultural social and personality psychology and she is also highly interested in Open Science and its effects on both, psychological research and the public’s understanding of science.

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